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* The Sámi
  • Joik and the theory of knowledge, a research by Ánde Somby, University of Tromsoe (Norway).
  • Sami Music, a brief introduction to traditional Sami song and the modern music.

  • Mari Boine, is one of the most popular and inspiring artists of her culture; blending elements of joik with other idioms - jazz, rock, world music - sculpting a sound which simultaneously exalts and transcends tradition.
  • Ulla Pirttijärvi, is a Sami vocalist from Northern Finland who offers a modern take on joikking. Her music sounds like Scandinavian folk goes deep into an ambient dub electronica cave and gets recorded by Peter Gabriel.
  • Wimme Saari, is a modern yoiker, mixing some elements of the old style yoiking with something new.
  • Ande Somby, is a traditional yoiker who yoiks persons, animals and landscapes. There are also some images from concerts and some sound samples at the page.
  • Tranjoik, creates music that is exciting, vital, and powerful! Song, throat joiking, a muezzin's call to prayer, rap, or recitation? Transjoik consists of four musicians who use the human voice in a way you've never heard before. Derived from old joik recordings on wax cylinders, the group's music establishes a mood that is at once modern and timeless and suggestive.
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* Scotland (including * Hebrides,  * Orkney, and  * Shetland)
  • Bugg Promotions & Ceilidhs, is a newly formed venture started in to promote experienced Scottish Ceilidh bands.
  • Shetland Music Development, a variety of Shetland based music of all kinds.

  • Adelante, their has been described as "Energetic Rebel" as well as "Very Musical". The Adelante sound the bhoys try and create is very much feet stomping rousing rebel tunes... but with a more musical approach. Some of the tastes include: rock, rebel, folk, and jazz.
  • Aff the Cuff, from Neil Gow to Dougie Mclean, from the Bothy Band to the Waterboys, Aff the Cuff take an eclectic view of the music they play.
  • The Alans, are a quartet of men who are of an age that should know better [according to their wives]. They share a first name and an interest in old-fashioned Scottish and Irish traditional music. The Alans perform an intoxicating mixture of Scottish and Irish tunes and songs, with melodies interchanged between the flute and mandolin, and verses and choruses passed between the singers.
  • Alasdair MacCuish & the Black Rose Ceildih Band, were formed in the early nineties at the height of the Ceilidh dance revival in Glasgow. Their style is very much focused on the demands of the dancer but musically they draw on influences from the wider Scottish and Irish contemporary folk scenes.
  • Albannach, are all born and bred in Scotland and their purpose in life is to share their intriguing culture, history and heritage by means of their music. Albannach are not just another Scottish "Pipes and Drums" band, indeed they bring a new and exciting form of music to your living room.
  • Alexander Brothers, it is now 48 years since Tom and Jack Alexander made their first appearance as professional entertainers at the Webster Theatre in Arbroath, Scotland. The Alexander Brothers have since, firmly established themselves as Scotland's leading international entertainers. They are as well known in Canada and the United States as they are in the UK.
  • Althing, this Edinburgh-based band is a collection of musicians from Scandinavia, the British Isles and Eastern Europe, who explore new combinations of tradition. With an intriguing line-up of three vocalists and three multi-instrumentalists, Althing bring together six musical styles and six languages yet create one dynamic and authentic sound.
  • Amh, are Andrew Robertson and Iseabail Mactaggart. Singing traditional Gaelic songs, they have developed a style that whilst modern and unique, respects the true essence of these songs. They've been called the future of Gaelic singing.
  • The Angel Brothers, this band is a unique talent, combining the very best of chilled out English dance music combined with fantastic Asian anglo beats.
  • Annasach, are an Edinburgh based Ceilidh Band and have been playing together since 1990. The overall sound of the band has a more folk based orientation consisting of an energetic, traditional fiddle led front line mixed with a forceful, funky piano and bass.
  • Auld Reekie Ceilidh Band, with fiddles, mandolin, piano, acoustic guitar and dance caller, the Auld Reekie Ceilidh Band has been playing great ceilidhs around Edinburgh for the last 10 years.
  • Auld Spice Band, Edinburgh's own Ceilidh and Function Band and have been playing together since 1997. With a comprehensive Ceilidh set list and able to provide a caller, they could be just what you are looking for when planning your next function.
  • Avalon an Edinburgh-based, folk-rock band.
  • The Ayrshire Fiddle Orchestra, play a mixture of traditional and modern Scots, Irish, Scandinavian and North American fiddle music, as well as an ever-growing repertoire of light classical pieces, film music and other well-known tunes.
  • Bachue, the mix of traditional Scottish tunes/jazz attitude with contemporary thinking is what makes this band so unique.
  • Back of the Moon, featuring pipes and fiddle woven with a solid guitar-piano rhythm section. This brilliant young quartet, all accomplished singers, deliver songs and tunes in a strong acoustic style.
  • Bag O' Cats, are musician's musicians, as passionate about the instruments as they are about the music. The result is a near-tactile amalgamation of sounds which you could willingly drown in - a touch of Eastern Europe here, North Africa there, blended through Scots, Irish and Indian influences, complete with complex time signatures and altered keys.
  • Aly Bain, is the best known and most significant fiddle player in the Celtic tradition. He is rightly regarded as Scotland's supreme traditional-style fiddler - arguably the finest of all time.
  • Aly Bain & Phil Cunningham, Scotland's supreme traditional style fiddler, Aly Bain, and one of the most exciting and innovative accordion players of the times, Phil Cunningham, are on the road together again !
  • Battlefield Band, inspired by their rich heritage of Celtic music and fired by the strength of today's Scottish cultural scene, which indeed they have done much to create and fuel, the band perform a music of rare passion and joy:
  • Beggar's Row, traditional Scottish and Irish music.
  • Bella MacNab's Dance Band, is a fiddle-driven ceilidh dance band which takes its inspiration from the traditional music of Scotland, Ireland and Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, where the fiddle is the main instrument for set dancing.
  • Belle Star Band, one of Scotland's top all-women dance bands, The Belle Star Band have got to be unique in spanning three cultures - Scottish Urban Ceilidh, Jewish Klezmer and Canadian/American Contradance. Their great sense of swing, strong fiddle-driven sound and love of playing for dancing make them the glue in any social gathering.
  • Bellowhead, is one of the most exciting bands to have emerged from the 2004 folk festivals. To describe their music is a very difficult thing indeed - the material is steeped in the English folk traditions of song and dance, but the feel is exciting, intoxicating, slightly sinister and deeply funky ...
  • The Benachally Ceilidh Band, are one of Scotland's most sought after ceilidh dance bands. The band features former members of Silly Wizard, Capercaillie, Dougie MacLean Band and others.
  • Martyn Bennett, born in Newfoundland, Canada, in 1971, Bennett moved to Scotland. Martyn was an incredibly gifted fiddler and piper who pioneered a fusion of traditional folk with house, hip-hop and dance music. He was able to pull together all these different threads he had in his head. Martyn died on 30th January 2005, following a long struggle with cancer.
  • Big Country, is a Scottish rock band, and it has nothing to do with country music. The band uses elements from rock music, folk music, traditional Scottish music and (occasionally and to a lesser degree) punk/hard rock. Their music has often been called folk rock.
  • The Big Squeeze, are an Edinburgh-based ceilidh collective who blend Scottish and Irish tunes, instrumentals and Gaelic mouth-music to create a uniquely driving sound.
  • Donald Black, is a harmonica player. His roots are firmly steeped in the West of Scotland Highland Pipe and Gaelic tradition, but his repertoire extends considerably beyond this to embrace the idioms of Ireland, Shetland, Cape Breton / Nova Scotia and mainstream Scotland.
  • Blazin Fiddles, 8-member Scottish fiddle super group includes the best young talent on offer.
  • Borders Young Fiddles, their repertoire includes a range of traditional music relating to the Borders as well as their own original tunes, and reflects some of the style inflections of well known Borders fiddlers of the recent past. With this project they have combined traditional Border tunes with their own tunes written in the traditional idiom, but they have also added some subtle classical, jazz and rock ideas, the personal touch and a gallon of energy and humour.
  • Boys of the Lough, are one of the past masters of Celtic music, combining members from several Celtic traditions with a long history. Like other long-running acts, their music tends to the formal, impeccable technique and sensitivity.
  • Sandy Brechin, has developed his own unique approach to the art of accordion playing and his innovative style is instantly recognisable. Over the years, Sandy has played in many bands, but is probably best known for his work with the Scottish bands, Burach and Seelyhoo.
  • Brolum, a Scottish band that has the power usually associate with Irish Music!
  • Bill Buchan, born in Aberdeen, he plays and sings the sea and people of North East Scotland. All his music is self penned and performed in the Doric of North East Aberdeenshire.
  • Burach Folk rockers. The seven piece line guarantee to fill the floor with frantic fiddle led mayhem and foot stomping songs.
  • Robert Burns, Scotland's greatest poet and one of the greatest songwriters and collector of the traditional music and songs of rural Scotland:
  • Caim, is Scottish singer Heather Innes and Irish singer Jacynth Hamill. Caim concerts feature sung prayers in the Celtic tradition plus traditional Scottish and Irish songs and stories.
  • Calasaig, are a 5 piece Scottish band, playing traditional music & song from Scotland, Ireland & England as well as their own compositions. Since the group's formation in the late 90s, Calasaig have secured an admirable reputation in the world of traditional music through their numerous performances and quality recordings.
  • Caledon, is Scotland's 3 Tenors Alan Beck, Jamie MacDougall, and Ivan Sharpe. Caledon is equally at home whether inspiring the 55,000 soccer crowd at Hampden Park with a stirring new version of Flower of Scotland, or on the stage of the world-famous Sydney Opera House, singing to a packed auditorium of music lovers.
  • Calluna, Scottish dance tunes and melodies, original compositions and Scots song.
  • Canned Haggis Ceilidh Band, from Argyll and Central Scotland, perform for dancing, on fiddle, guitar, keyboards, flute and vocals. Available for Weddings, Functions, Clubs, Pubs, Background with Dance Caller. The band play a mixture of Scottish and Irish influence.
  • Cantara, is a folk rock band based in Edinburgh. Group members originate from various musical backgrounds. As a result of their contrasting backgrounds they have developed a unique fusion of Scottish and world music.
  • Canterach, founder member Ross Kennedy started the band Canterach in 1991. The cornerstone of the bands sound has always been to have a blend of great musicians from the Scottish folk scene. Meshing together the wild sound of acoustic guitar, bouzuki and piano which drives the pipes, whistles and fiddles soaring with rich melodies and adding percussion to colour the sound. Also encompassed in the band's tapestry are the great Scottish ballads and songs.
  • Cantrip, combine Scottish traditional roots with widely cosmopolitan musical appetites. Their debut album aligns Celtic, Scandinavian, French, Basque, East European and original material, plus contemporary rock, Americana and jazz accents, into a uniquely diverse yet brilliantly coherent whole.
  • Capercaillie, is a highly successful popular Scottish group playing modern arrangements of trad music.
  • Cappella Nova, are Scotland's leading professional vocal ensemble specialising in early (medieval and renaissance) and contemporary music. They have made twelve CDs of Scottish (mostly!) vocal music from medieval times to the present day and they are particularly well-known for their recordings of early Scottish composers such as Robert Carver, Robert Johnson, David Peebles and the ever-present and prolific "Anonymous".
  • Ceilidh Minogue, is an enthusiastic, high energy Scottish ceilidh band that never fails to make ceilidhs a success.
  • Celtic Fiddle Festival, is a group rather than an event, a combination of one of the best fiddlers from each of three celtic countries - Johnny Cunningham of Scotland, Kevin Burke of Ireland and Christian Lemaitre from Brittany. Celtic Fiddle Festival II is a completely new group, consisting of Martin Hayes (Ireland), Natalie McMaster (Cape Breton, Canada) and Brian McNeill (Scotland), with guitarists Dennis Cahill and Tony McManus.
  • Ceolbeg, innovative Scottish traditional group.
  • Chitterybite Ceilidh Band, originally formed in 1998, Chitterybite play an eclectic mix of traditional ceilidh and contemporary music; traditional dances as well as various traditional songs and a range of contemporary songs, including Van Morrison, Proclaimers, Beatles, Eagles, Rod Stewart, Lynard Skynard etc. There is a lot of variety in their set to suit most musical tastes!
  • The Clach, the North of Scotland's finest harmony folk band singing unaccompanied and accompanied, Scottish, Irish and American Folk Songs and Sea Shanties.
  • Clamjamfrie, are a five piece Ceilidh combo. They play a lively blend of Scots and Irish traditional songs and music, primarily Ceilidh with a West Coast feel.
  • Clan Wallace, the descendants of Scottish hero William Wallace, appeared in the successful "Braveheart" movie. Music and dance from the ancient Scotland, a big band with 16 artists, musicians (Highland bagpipes + drums) and dancers.
  • Clann An Drumma is an exciting, energetic and rhythmic band, from Glasgow. Their music has been passed down to us from their ancestors and is dominated by rhythm, enhanced by the skirl of the pipes, flavoured with enchanting vocals and wrapped in the warmth of their country. Clann An Drumma's thunderous approach to percussion gives a brilliant new flair to those traditional pieces - and brings a whole new style of music to your living room.
  • Pete Clark, in addition to his highly successful solo career as a fiddler, Pete has been a member of several bands including Heritage and Smeddum and is currently a member of Benachally Ceilidh Band.
  • Cliar, have fast become one of Scotland's leading bands, with their infectious mixture of stunning Gaelic vocals and great Highland music. From heart-breaking Gaelic love-songs and slow airs to high-energy fiddle reels and tongue-twisting mouth music, Cliar's live performances are not to be missed.
  • Cloud9, based in Glasgow, are one of the hottest, new, all girl Scottish music bands in the UK. They ylay a variety of traditional Scottish tunes mixed with original compositions, all arranged in our own inimatable style.
  • Clova, Glasgow-based band, they have established themselves in the Scottish "new folk" circuit with spirited and vivacious performances. Their music has been described as "acoustic with attitude" and "protest music for the 21st century".
  • Coila, is an Ayrshire based ceilidh band. Consisting of four professional musicians who have played traditional music together for over 15 years, the band specialises in Scottish music using accordion, fiddle and drums delivering a modern sound using contemporary melodies and rhythms.
  • Coinneach, are a band from the Highlands of Scotland, based in the Easter Ross area. The energetic four-piece have wowed crowds at home and abroad and have built up a considerable fan-base with their own unique flavour of Celtic rock music and highly charged performances. Coinneach have created their own fine mix of sounds - from soul searching songs to foot-stomping frantic fiddle frenzies.
  • Coronach, based in Inverness, the enterprising group of instrumentalists have specialised forover 17 years in performances of the courtly and popular music of Renaissance Scotland on a wide range of early wind, stringed and keyboard instruments and more recently a concort of voices. The Music is researched and edited for the group by its director James Ross.
  • The Corries, a Scottish folk duo
  • Craigenroan Ceilidh Band, Scottish traditional dance music.
  • Croft No. 5, the fusion of traditional folk music with dance culture has already been investigated by a number of Scots worthies. Highland sextet Croft No. Five are the latest in line and make a fine fist of blending deep dance, funk grooves and samples with a surprisingly complementary range of folk favourites, from accordion through to whistles.
  • Johnny Cunningham, has been playing fiddle since the age of seven, and was known for his lightning-fast reels and hauntingly beautiful Scottish airs. He also delighted audiences worldwide with his wry humor and stories. All too suddenly, Johnny passed away on December 15, 2003.
  • Phil Cunningham, he started to play with Silly Wizard, but his work began to broaden and to take him outside the framework of the band. He began to find himself in demand as a composer and performer for television, radio, film and stage. Phil left Silly Wizard in 1983 to pursue a solo career.
  • Da Hooley Ceilidh Band, is an Edinburgh-based 4-6 piece Ceilidh band. The core band consists of Ros on fiddle, Drew on accordion, Dougie on guitar/vocals and Adele, an experienced caller, who can coax the shyest of dancers on to the floor and, with the use of a radio mike, can demonstrate dance steps. They play a mainly Scots/Irish repertoire with dances to suit all abilities from ceilidh "virgins" to the more experienced ceilidh dancer.
  • Daimh, bringing together an exciting combination of young musicians from Ireland, Cape Breton, California and the Highlands of Scotland, the band embodies the close links that still exist in today's Gaelic world. Each of the members draw from their own cultures and traditions, yet lock together musically to produce a breathtakingly fluid and arousing sound which has been setting audiences alight from North America to Eastern Europe.
  • Patricia Daly, All-Ireland champion harper and singer, she has been performing on the Irish traditional music circuit since the 1970s when she first became a member of the world renowned Armagh Pipers Club.
  • Dannsa, has been blazing a trail throughout the Highlands of Scotland performing their unique blend of percussive Scottish step dancing with traditional dances. It is driven by the dynamic and passionate music played on pipes, fiddle, clarsach, and Gaelic song. Drawing from the many rich and varied traditions throughout Scotland, Dannsa will provide you with a night to remember.
  • Darloch Ceilidh Band, is a Ceilidh dance band formed in 1998 from two World Champion Ceilidh Bands, Hot Toddy and the Govan Spoonful. An energetic sound is produced by midi accordion, electric fiddle and kit drums and all the dances are talked through and demonstrated for the bigger events. For the more modern occasion a singer is also available with songs from the 60's through to the current day.
  • Deaf Shepherd, are a band who truly set the musical spirit of Scotland aglow. Since their first appearance this young Scottish band are making a powerful impression on the Scottish music scene.
  • Dìleas, Ben Edom and Debra Carey blend clarsach (Harp), Celtic guitar, bodhran, Gaelic, Scots and Irish songs into an enchanting and compelling mix. They bring together the best in Scottish and Irish traditional music with a dash of jazz, blues, classical and flamenco, expressing their full range of contemporary Celtic music.
  • Dochas, the five girls, from the Highlands and Islands of Scotland exude professionalism and rare talent throughout their performances of traditional music and song. With an armoury of fiddle, twin bagpipes, accordion, clàrsach, piano and guitar, they can play big rumbustious barnstorming tunes with the best of them - and then turn round and slay you with the exquisite poignancy and lyricism of Julie Fowlis's Gaelic singing: a suitably sparkling finish to a memorable weekend.
  • Drop the Box, drawing on the strong music tradition of their native Shetland this brilliant young five piece serve up generous helpings of funky feelgood fayre in a fusion of World, Indie, Reggae and explosive Folk.
  • Eriskay Lilt, popular husband and wife duo they have achieved a large and loyal following throughout their native Scotland. Simply put, they represent live entertainment at its best! They are equally at home playing for weddings and parties as they are appearing at pubs and clubs. With a unique blend of Scottish, Ceilidh, Irish, Country & Western and Pop Music, their versatility has proved extremely popular time and time again.
  • Alasdair Fraser is widely acclaimed as a top performer, recording artist and teacher of the rich fiddling tradition of his native Scotland.
  • Iain Fraser, arrived later than some to the idea of performing but definitely made an entrance with a wonderfully engaging style on stage that blends the passion of the tradition with the rythms of the dance. Iain grew up surrounded by music and now tours regularly throught Scotland and North America with a large repertoire that ranges from older 18th century tunes to new compositions inspired by his family and surroundings in his adopted home in the Scottish Borders.
  • Fiddlers' Bid, are leading exponents of the Shetland Island's rich fiddle tradition and have delighted audiences all around the World.
  • Fraser Fifield composer, producer and multi-instrumentalist lives in Edinburgh, Scotland. He leads the Fraser Fifield Trio and also writes and produces music for film, television and a variety of other projects. Previously he has been known for his performances with groups such as Old Blind Dogs, Salsa Celtica, Wolfstone, Bag O Cats, Mick West Band...
  • Filska, are a band from the Shetland Islands, who have built their music on the Islands tradition of fiddle playing. The band have integrated an increasing amount of original tunes and songs to their set, as well as performing their own native music. This fresh and dynamic approach to both traditional, Shetland and contemporary tunes are what give Filska their highly unique and innovative sound.
  • Fine Friday, yhis band with exquisitely articulated fiddle, percussively accented flute, guitar wizardry and choice vocal harmonies, is without doubt the finest example of traditional musical interplay in Scotland today. With discerning material and a collective musicality that belies their age, Fine Friday have wowed audiences across the world on tours of Europe, Canada, Australia and of course on their home turf in Scotland.
  • Helen Flaherty, is a Scottish singer and bodhran player, living in Antwerp. Helen's repertoire consists of both traditional and recent compositions in the traditional vein.
  • Fribo, is a young, vibrant, Edinburgh based three-piece who combine the Scandinavian and Scottish traditions with an exuberant feel for contemporary sounds and rhythms. Anne Sofie Valdal's beautiful and subtle vocals are combined with Sarah-Jane Summers' highland fiddle style and Ewan MacPherson's guitar and vocals. Whether it's Norwegian or English songs, Scottish or Scandinavian tunes, Fribo mould music from many shores and add their own twist.
  • Gaberlunzie, are well known for producing an exciting blend of modern and traditional songs, essentially Scottish, with an emphasis on rhythm and harmony,
  • The Gallivanters Ceilidh Band, are a five piece Ceilidh Band based in Perthshire comprising accordion, double bass, fiddle, guitar, mandolin and whistles. The combination of instruments gives a bright and vibrant yet traditional sound. They play a variety of Scottish and Irish tunes for dancing as well as singing Scottish, Irish, Country and even Beatles songs.
  • Gander Band, is an East Midlands based Ceilidh Band who have been around for more years now than anyone can care to remember.
  • Dick Gaughan, is one of folk music's guitar geniuses as well as one of Scotland's finest singers. He was a co-founder of Boys of the Lough, Five Hand Reel, Clan Alba... and he has been described by several influential writers as a "legend". His album "Handful of Earth" was voted the album of the decade by readers of "Folk Roots" and he has been listed in the 100 best guitarists of the world.
  • GiveWay, are four young sisters who play a heady mixture of Scottish traditional music, from haunting airs to lively jigs and energetic reels, with the occasional song as well.
  • The Glenhoulachan Midgie Club Ceilidh Band (The Midgies), differ from many other Ceilidh bands in that they are "folk based". They sing the traditional songs of Scotland and play the Western Isles tunes of Uist, Barra and Islay.
  • Goats Don't Shave, deliver what has to be one of the finest and exciting sounds in Celtic Rock.
  • Phamie Gow, trad meets classic. Phamie Gow, graduate of the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama, has a sensibility for both worlds. She is internationally known for the originality of her compositions and the virtuosity of her clarsach playing.
  • Annie Grace, grew up in the Highlands. Music played a large part in her formative years, and she began learning to play the bagpipes at the tender age of ten. She was/is involved in many projects (Iron Horse, Scottish Women 2001/2002, The Unusual Suspects, theatre performances, etc.).
  • Sara Grey, she has a certain quality of voice that compels you to give her your undivided attention. Her voice is both powerful and sweet with a distinctive and lovely tremolo. It is a voice well suited to native American ballads and ballads of Ireland and Scotland. She has always been interested in the migration of songs across the Atlantic and it was as a result of a collecting trip to Scotland in 1970 that she moved to the UK.
  • Gordon Gunn, is one of Scotland's most accomplished fiddle players who regularly plays at concerts, festivals, with his own band - The Gordon Gunn Band - and with Session A9.
  • Harem Scarem, their Line-up - on fiddles, flutes, accordian, guitar and vocals - hails variously from Orkney, Shetland, the west Highlands and Ireland, while their repertoire casts its net further, taking in Scandinavian, French, Cape Breton, Balkan and Asturian tunes as well as Scottish and Irish material.
  • Heartland, are Kate Stewart-Liddon and John Masson, a fiddle and guitar duo based on the Isle of Skye. Heartland play extensively throughout the Highlands and Islands of Scotland and have also played in Europe, the USA and Russia. Their material is drawn from traditional tunes and songs as well as their own compositions.
  • Heeliegoleerie, is Eilidh Steel (fiddle), Mark Neal (guitar, cittern, vocals) and Ali MacLeod (djembe). They bring a fresh approach to Scottish music, with a mixture of tunes and songs from a range of traditions, as well as a plentiful supply of their own compositions. The band covers an array of styles, from high energy reels to the mellowest of slow airs.
  • Craig Herbertson, Scottish folk singer and songwriter.
  • Corrina Hewat, over the last years, singer and harp player Corrina Hewat has emerged as one of the most distinctive, original and versatile artists on the contemporary Scottish scene. Synthesising the energies and idioms of traditional, jazz and classical music, in formats ranging from entirely solo to a 31-piece "folk orchestra", Corrina's combined talents as a vocalist, instrumentalist, composer and arranger have won steadily increasing acclaim among critics, fellow musicians and audiences alike.
  • Hom Bru, began playing together back in their native Shetland Islands in 1978. Although the line up has changed several times over the last 25 years, they even play music from Shetland and beyond.
  • Hoogie, traditional and modern Scottish music forms the backbone of the group's repertoire including many of their own compositions in a modern Scottish idiom, both for listening and for dancing.
  • HotScotch Ceilidh Band, offers a vibrant blend of traditional and contemporary Scottish dance music. An exciting mix of accordion, fiddle, and drums will provide just the right atmosphere for a cracking night. All of the ceilidh dances can be called by the band to ensure all can join in whatever their experience. The band are based in Edinburgh, but travel all over Scotland and the North of England.
  • The Howff Band, is a Scottish Ceilidh band with a unique and refreshing mixture of Celtic traditional and contemporary Ceilidh music, coupled with classic folk, rock and pop songs that will make your festival wedding or ceilidh go with a swing!
  • Alistair Hulett, is one of Scotland's finest singer / songwriters and interpreters of traditional song.
  • Ken Hyder, a jazzy Scot from Dundee. He played the northern hemisphere the long way round from Vancouver to Vladivostok with a lot of jazz musicians, ethnic musicians, Celtic musicians, Tibetan and Japanese Buddhist monks, and Siberian and Korean shamans.
  • The Ian Muir Sound, is one of the busiest bands on the Scottish Dance Scene and have performed not only in their native Scotland but all over England and Northern Ireland as well as Eire.
  • William Jackson, composer, harpist and multi-instrumentalist he has been at the forefront of Scottish music for many years.
  • Jock Tamson's Bairns, is one of Scottish most respected bands, having carried the torch for true/ Scottish music since their inception at the end of the 1970s.
  • Junction Pool, consisting of thirteen young musicians from Kelso in the Scottish Borders, Junction Pool energetically merges musical styles in an uplifting fusion of folk, jazz and funk. Part folk band, part funk outfit, Junction Pool unites a diverse array of instruments, from fiddle to electric guitar; flute and whistles to djembe drums with pipes and brass. Under the direction of Harris Playfair, the band welds traditional and contemporary melodies with uplifting grooves and cutting-edge arrangements, resulting in an original and infectious live experience.
  • Moira Kerr, is one of Scotland's most talented singer / songwriters:
  • The Kitchen Band, four piece multi instrumental group from West Central Scotland, playing Scottish, Irish, English and American folk songs and tunes.
  • Koshka, is a Glasgow-based trio. Their version of World, Gypsy and Jazz sends a huge emotional surge that never lets up, twinned with masterly musicianship and an extraordinary range of tones and timbres.
  • Donald Lindsay, plays Scottish Smallpipes, Highland Bagpipes, Whistle, Hungarian Pipes, Been (Indian Chanter), Sings, and Fretless Acoustic Guitar.
  • Lyra Celtica, working tirelessly on the Scottish Folk Club circuit, the band have steadily built up a reputation amongst music lovers throughout the country. This achievement is all the more notable when one considers that several of the band members could have relied on their own individual reputations to propel them to the top of the tree. The blend of music, and the musical chemistry between these four individuals, has been allowed to flourish and develop while the band has worked at establishing their name over years in Scotland.
  • Ishbel MacAskill, possesses a vocal tone of alluring, compelling warmth and beauty, but that's not the only reason why she floated effortlessly into the leading position among Gaelic singers.
  • Catriona Macdonald, Shetland fiddle playing of the highest pedigree in its most free-spirited form.
  • Heather Macleod, having honed her talents on everything from traditional Gaelic ballads to classic jazz and blues, contemporary folk to cutting-edge pop, she has long been recognised across the Scottish music scene as an exceptionally gifted and versatile vocal interpreter. More recently, she's been expanding this already impressive portfolio with her own potently emotive, lyrically insightful songwriting, a new vein of work that's winning acclaim from peers and critics alike.
  • MacUmba, create an exciting fusion of original and traditional Scottish pipe music with the pulsing street rhythms of Brazil.
  • Lauren MacColl, brought up in the Black Isle and now based in Glasgow, Lauren MacColl is quickly establishing herself as "the leading light in the galaxy of young fiddle players". Immersed in the rich culture of the Highlands, her repertoire reflects her northern background and shows the influence of visiting tutor, Aonghas Grant of Lochaber and her love for Gaelic and Pipe music.
  • Jim MacGrath, accordion player. Traditional and original compositions which by their eclectic nature reflect both the Irish and Scottish musical traditions in Ulster. A melody maker par excellence, Jim McGrath breaks the mould of traditional ceili dance music with glorious tunes that reflect his own generous spirit, a genuine sense of place, and the pure good fun of the best community gatherings.
  • MacKenzie, a Gaelic vocal group of sisters Eilidh, Gillian and Fiona from the village of Gress on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, is the result of many years of involvement in the world of music and song - Gaelic music and song in particular.
  • Rob MacKillop, performer, recording artist, lecturer and researcher in Scottish music for lutes and guitars.
  • Mad Parrot Ceilidh Band, is a ceilidh rock band with dance caller. They have played throughout Scotland, and are experienced folk and rock musicians. Although based in Tayside, will travel throughout Scotland and beyond for ceilidh dances, festivals, weddings, parties, corporate functions and concerts.
  • Meantime, are a quartet of musicians from the Highlands and Islands who are intent on expanding the repertoire of Gaelic song as well as instrumental music. Meantime are building a growing reputation as a young band with a powerful presence in Gaelic music, both vocal and instrumental, new and traditional. All four members are Gaelic speakers, and all four sing. The musicians are dedicated to the idea not only of preserving and nurturing the Gaelic heritage, but of adding to it in the shape of new songs and tunes.
  • Jim Malcolm, is an accomplished singer and songwriter of considerable depth and versatility. He is also a performer of traditional Scots music and song with particularly strong links to the ballads of Perthshire and Angus where he grew up. Furthermore, he is a fine exponent of simultaneous guitar and harmonica playing.
  • Malinky, this Scots/Irish five-piece have emerged as one of the hottest properties on the international Celtic scene. Their song-centred repertoire combines a deep appreciation of tradition with a vibrant freshness of approach, taking in both classic ballads and outstanding original songwriting, alongside sparkling instrumental sets.
  • Claire Mann, is highly regarded as a tutor of traditional music and has toured extensively with bands Tabache, Craobh Rua and Christy O'Leary. She met and Aaron Jones (Old Blind Dogs) on the thriving Edinburgh folk music scene several years ago. Over the years they have developed a unique and exciting musical relationship, performing a mixture of traditional and contemporary Scottish and Irish music and song.
  • Karen Marshalsay, Scottish harper and composer drawing on a wealth of differing experiences, from work within the Gaelic and Scottish traditions to studies with Paraguayan harp master Rito Pederson.
  • Karen Matheson, when Sean Connery described Karen Matheson as having "a throat surely touched by the hand of God." and Billboard magazine described her as "the finest Gaelic singer alive today..." this tells only part of the remarkable story of a singer who deserves much wider recognition in mainstream music.
  • The McCalmans, are Scotland's foremost folk song trio. Formed in 1964, they have continued to record and tour without interruption Their performance is based on searing three part harmony, humour and a respect for the tradition of song in Scotland.
  • Alistair McCulloch, three times former National Fiddle Champion, he is one of the busiest and best-known fiddlers in Scotland and is in constant demand as a performer, teacher, adjudicator and composer.
  • John McCusker's impressive musical talent combined with his love for the traditional music of his native Scotland has rightfully gained him the respect of audiences and artists from around the globe.
  • Matt McGinn, Glasgow singer, songwriter, poet and raconteur was Scotland's undisputed "King of Folk" in the 1960s and 70s. The humour, uncanny perceptiveness and rare talents of Matt McGinn made him a household name in Scotland and in Folk circles throughout the world. Matt went on to be regarded as one of Britain's most powerful folk writers and became one of Scotland's leading folksingers of his time. He died in 1977 at the age of only 49, but left some 500 songs, many of which have become classics.
  • Dougie McLean, has for many years been at the forefront of the development of Scottish music and song. His innovative work has created a modern interpretation of this music but it's fundamental values remain rooted in the ancient Scot's culture:
  • Tony McManus, is one of the world's leading guitarists. The funny thing is that his music doesn't sound obviously Celtic, despite the fact that most of the sets are.
  • Alison McMorland & Geordie McIntyre, with contrasting and complementing approaches are a treat for anyone who enjoys traditional Scots song and the Border heritage. Alison is well-known for her presentation of the songs of Border shepherd Willie Scott, and it comes she is also a renowned five-string banjo player. She and Geordie both accompany their songs on guitar too, so a varied evening is promised whether you are into the 'muckle sangs' or newer transatlantic influences.
  • Bran McNeill, one of the best known Scottish musician, ex-Battlefield Band.
  • Jimi McRae, Highland, Lowland, Border, Arabic and Electronic pipes player, he produce traditional music for the 21st Century, fusing modern beats and ancient instruments.
  • Anna Mhoireach (Anna Murray), young Gaelic singer and piper.
  • Mick West Band, MW is considered by many to be one of the foremost exponents of Scottish traditional song.
  • The Midden, this impressive trio may play modern folk/pop mixed with the Celtic music of their home country, but that's where the similarities to the Corrs end: mostly because the Scottish sisterly trio who are The Midden are a damn sight more interesting and inventive than the Corrs. And while they might not have as high a profile as their Irish counterparts that looks set to change pretty soon.
  • Fred Morrison's dazzling performances on the Highland pipes, Border pipes, uilleann pipes and low whistle have established him as one of Scotland's most unique and powerful artists. He is renowned across the world music scene for the quality of his musical connection with every audience, for his awesome piping technique and for the sheer power of his individual musical expression.
  • Nackytoosh, a passion for music and a desire to do something fresh and new with traditional dance music brought four guys with varying musical backgrounds together to form the ceilidh band Nackytoosh. While remaining firmly rooted in a traditional framework our unique style explores our own varied musical influences including elements of jazz, Latin American, rock/pop and funk, blended with traditional Scottish and Irish tunes.
  • New Celeste, a jazzy Celt-rock sound mixed with touches of worldbeat.
  • North Sea Gas, Scottish folk band, with the combination of many instruments complementing fine vocals, harmonies and a keen sense of humor an entertaining evening is guaranteed.
  • Nusa, began with Rory Campbell and Malcolm Stitt, who had been playing music together since 1994 when they both started playing with the band Deaf Shepherd and, have since, often found themselves collaborating on various projects on the folk scene. The material that Rory and Malcolm were playing drew heavily on original compositions and contemporary arrangements with strong traditional feel. Then they hooked up with Bryan Jones (DJ Extra) which added a new dimension; live deck playing along with the usual pipes/whistle and guitar material. Malcolm recently left the group to pursue other interests and has been replaced by the very capable Jonny Hardie (Old Blind Dogs) on guitar and backing vocals.
  • The Occasionals, are widely regarded as one of the foremost Scottish ceilidh dance bands, and have been playing for dancing the length and breadth of Europe since 1986. The Occasionals are available for all types of bookings; ceilidh dances, concerts, conferences, festivals, weddings, parties, and old time dances, and are fully equipped with the latest sound system designed to give the best sound in any venue. The band will travel far and wide, and we look forward to hearing from you!.
  • Old Blind Dogs, Scottish quartet playing driving trad-based music.
  • Orwell Ceilidh Band, is based in the Fife area and was formed in 2000. They are an energetic group playing traditional tunes arranged in their own way, as well as some original piece.
  • Paddyrasta, formed in Aberdeen in November 2004, play a fresh, original blend of reggae and traditional Celtic melodies inter-weaved with heartfelt, socially concious lyrics.
  • Judith Peacock, harper and Gaelic singer, now works freelance in both traditional and classical music and has played with several orchestras.
  • Graeme E. Pearson / The Mutineers, play a unique brand of Folk/Rock with a variety of traditional and modern styles. They have progressed and evolved from your "common or garden" pub band, playing well known standards, to one of individual character.
  • The Peatbog Faeries are a Skye based band the core of which has been together for the past five years. The present line-up have been playing their own brand of traditional fusion for the last 2 years
  • The Picts, have reached out with their unique brand of Celtic Rock and captivated hundreds of audiences both at home and abroad.
  • Pipedown, is a band from Edinburgh with a line-up of Highland and Lowland pipes, mandolin, guitar and percussion. Drawing on influences from Scottish and Irish traditions, together with Celtic music worldwide, the result has been a powerful and distinctive sound, rich in melody and dynamics.
  • Piperactive, with its Celtic roots and modern influences, this band combines the tradition of the Highland Bagpipe with the sounds of more than 15 new and old instruments from the last two thousand years, to make the funkiest toe-tapping riffs you'll ever hear from a Scottish band. The "full-on" big Celtic sound incorporates lamenting aires, fast and furious jigs, and rugged reels arranged to exciting modern techno, disco, reggae, soul, gospel, and earthy Celtic rhythms.
  • The Porridge Men, are an Edinburgh and Glasgow-based band who play Scottish music with traditional instruments (fiddle, bagpipes, accordion, drums, and erm, didgeridoo) ... but with a real modern twist.
  • Rallion, are a four piece traditional folk group, hailing from Edinburgh and Glasgow. The current line-up is Marieke McBean (vocals, bodhran, djembe, guitar), Stevie Lawrence (guitar, bouzouki), Andrew Lyons (fiddle, cittern) and Fiona Cuthill (fiddle, whistles, recorder). Rallion has been playing together since early 2003.
  • Randan, exceptionally gifted band playing Scottish and Irish music and song with a new edge.
  • Patsy Reid, is one of Scotland's leading young fiddle players. Patsy has many strings to her bow, not only is she an outstanding player with flair and intellect, she is also a wonderful teacher and composer.
  • Rev Band, Jon Rev is based in Aberdeenshire and he is recognised for his electric violin playing and for his own unique compositions. He was a full-time member of "The Fife" and part-time member of "Crann Tara", and now gigs as "R.E.V. Beat Unlimited" both solo and with other musicians.
  • Rise, is an alt.folk band from the Scottish West Coast Island of Bute. The band has also been described in America as 'ecletic, original, inventive, very musical and highly evocative'.
  • Rock Salt & Nails, Scottish band from Shetland; they perform traditional tunes to an acoustic rock arrangement alongside their own songs which integrate the fiddle and guitar closely with the vocals.
  • Royzone, are a great Ceilidh Band and guarantee a wonderful night of entertainment.
  • Runrig, are a 6-piece band from Scotland, who play a mixture of folk-influenced rock and traditional ceilidh tunes. Most of the members are Gaelic speakers, and the band perform some haunting songs in their native tongue:
  • Runt O' The Litter, Scotlands No. 1 goot-time folk band. They play a wild mix of traditional folk music, blinding sets of jigs and reels, country, blues and even the odd rock'n'roll number
  • Alistair Russell, singing and playing folk music since his teens, and over twenty years a professional musician, Alistair sings songs mainly from his family homeland Scotland, its neighbour Ireland, self-penned songs inspired by his world-wide travelling with Battlefield Band, and any other song that takes his fancy.
  • Russell's House, play traditional music of the various regions of countries such as Ireland, Scotland, Brittany, Northern Spain, and America among others. They are a relatively new band but comprise of members who have been involved with many different bands and projects over the years.
  • Sal, are based in Aberdeen. Sal's sound is rooted in the folk music of Scotland, Ireland and America with strong harmonies that have been described a "contemporary John Martyn times two!" Influenced by Bert Jansch and Tim Buckley Sal's repertoire includes interpretations of traditional songs to acoustic versions of classic punk and rock via their own original material.
  • Salsa Celtica, Edinburgh's most probable best Salsa band: a fusion of Scottish Melodies and Latin beats.
  • Saltfishforty, are Douglas Montgomery and Brian Cromarty. The sound is an energetic combination of Brian's rowdy songs and Douglas' gutsy spontaneous fiddling. Saltfishforty's sound is a melting pot of the traditional, bluegrass, swing and blues.
  • Scalags, were formed in August 2003 from the meeting of Amelia Campbell and Dave Harnetty, what has emerged is a collection of music that is eclectic in style, moving through celtic moods, mixed with alternative-rock-indi-house-ambient-roots.
  • Scocha, foot stomping, sing-along, rousing, emotional, heart pounding, a Scocha gig is packed with the feel-good factor. Traditional Scottish and Celtic music and song with a Rock'n'Roll attitude. The band is equally at home on the big stage or the specialist function.
  • Scotland's Ceilidh Band, providing entertainment for weddings, functions and corporate events. The Scottish dance band provides professional "caller", accordianists, fiddle, drum and keyboard players as required. Contemporary ceilidh-disco mix available.
  • Scott Harvey Ceilidh Band, is a traditional Scottish Ceilidh Band based in Glasgow. With a line up of 2 accordions, banjo and drums, the band have a unique and lively sound and are a favourite for Scottish weddings, Ceilidh dances and parties.
  • The Scottish Fiddle Orchestra, is one of Scotland's foremost traditional music organisations. The aim was to have a group of approximately 150 keen and interested musicians who would play together consistently, provide a series of concerts in the main Scottish cities and work together to create the finest possible standard of orchestral fiddle playing without detracting from the strong traditional strains of Scottish traditional music.
  • Scottish Guitar Quartet, inspired by Celtic, modern, classical and jazz genres, fused with World influences to create music that combines these diverse styles producing a powerfully elegant, eclectic sound that is truly distinctive. Each musician has his own individual style, a vital ingredient in any ensemble however; the textures and timbres emanating from four acoustic guitars produce an electrifying experience for every listener.
  • The Scottish Stepdance Company, are an inventive and dynamic new group, committed to the promotion, performance, and re-integration of Scottish stepdance into the current traditional music scene in Scotland. Their music is by no means purely traditional - the combination of funky, dynamic guitar playing with spontaneous and rhythmic fiddling, and wild, driving piping produces a highly innovative and unique sound... In contrast, the singing ranges from soft and haunting Gaelic airs & traditional Scots song, to lively puirt a beul (mouth music) and work songs.
  • Sgorrabreac, four-piece Edinburgh-based band, Sgorrabreac, were formed in 2004 and have quickly become established on the folk music and Gaelic music scenes. They focus on a wide-ranging Gaelic song repertoire and on the Scottish and Irish tune repertoire and aim to create musical arrangements which best suit the mood and spirit of the songs and tunes.
  • Shebeen, a well known name in the Irish rebel scene:
  • Shinaig, are a band of young talent fusing traditional Celtic folk, country and Ceilidh music with good old rock and roll producing one of the finest and exciting sounds to emerge in the new wave of Celtic Rock.
  • Shine, 3 stunning voices, 2 Camac electroharps, 1 sensational, vibrant, contemporary sound. Shine will uplift you with their challenging, breath-taking harmonies and rich rhythmic harps in beautiful arrangements of traditional and contemporary songs in Gaelic, Scots and English.
  • Shooglenifty, one of Scotland's top Celtic/Rock groups.
  • Shoormal, Shetland's Contemporary Folk Music with a strong focus on vocal harmony. Shoormal's music has developed to blend traditional and contemporary styles in an acoustic manner with songwriting becoming an integral part of their work.
  • Silly Wizard, one of the greatest of the Scots folk revival groups.
  • James Scott Skinner, (August 5, 1843 - March 17, 1927) was a famous Scottish fiddler and composer who played with a definitive classical style that influenced contemporary and subsequent Scottish fiddlers and their music for over a century. In addition, Skinner was quick to use the technology of the post-Victorian era and had recorded more than 30 tunes by February, 1910, on the new medium of the cylinder recording.
  • Slievenamon "Celtic/Irish Music To Infinity And Beyond!".
  • Solan, play traditional, contemporary and original songs and tunes mainly from the British Isles but also some from further afield. Traditional and contemporary music and stories from the North-western edge of Europe (Shetland).
  • Sons Of The Rock, was formed by Norrie Black (guitar & vocals) and Bob Blewitt (guitar & vocals) in 1988. Elaine Allison (vocals) joined in 1994, increasing the harmony range and enabling a wider repertoire of songs to be performed. The musical influences of the band range from Scottish/Irish traditional folk music through to American folk and Country music with some classical and choir and middle of the road music thrown in for good measure. The sounds of the Sixties were also a huge influence on Bob and Norrie.
  • Starlit 3, Jennifer Port, Rachel Hair and Rachel Newton have spent years developing their own unique style of playing traditional music on the Scottish harp, otherwise known as the Clarsach. Through their ingenious use of captivating harmonies, dynamic rhythm and spirited melodies, in both ensemble and solo formats, Starlit 3 aim to push the boundaries of harp playing, while still remaining true to their traditional roots.
  • Steven Spence, for many years he has been one of Shetland's premier fiddle players and composers.
  • Davy Steele, from a young age Davy sang at family ceilidhs and then, later, at secondary school, where his interest in folk music was awakened. Davy's songs are often political, inspired by current events, but underlying them is the constancy of Scottish traditional music.
  • Andy M. Stewart, is one of Celtic music's most gifted singers and one of the best songwriter in the entire folk tradition. As a member of Silly Wizard, he wrote stunning originals such as "The Queen of Argyll", "The Valley of Strathmore", and many others.
  • Wendy Stewart, Scottish harpist and former member of Ceolbeg.
  • Stravaig, are currently the top acapella group in Scotland, their superb blend of songs, from traditional ballads to music hall send-ups has won acclaim throughout the world. They are collectors of traditional songs particularly from Dumfries and Galloway, the area of South West Scotland where they live.
  • Swingin' Fiddles, Laura, Maggie and Astryd are the core of a young and energetic Shetland band.
  • The Tannahill Weavers, another historical band...
  • Tarneybackle, is one of Scotland's popular folk groups, performing a wide range of traditional and contemporary folk music. They sing mainly Scottish folk songs, adding in some tunes and material from North America and Ireland. Close harmony singing is Tarneybackle's hallmark. Songs are accompanied by a sensitive blend of guitar, mandolin, bouzouki, octave mandola, flute, whistles and percussion.
  • Teannaich, are a 5 piece high energy folk band crossing traditional folk with many other styles including rock, funk and jazz. Playing a mixture of traditional and original Scottish and Irish folk tunes on fiddle and mandolin, backed with a powerful backline of guitar, bass and drums.
  • Neil Thomson and Gerry Cambridge, bouzouki player, guitarist and songwriter Neil Thomson and harmonica player and poet Gerry Cambridge have been playing together regularly since being invited to appear alongside Scottish Traditional Musician winner Gillian Frame in the newly refurbished Britannia Music Hall on Argyll St. as part of Celtic Connections in 2003. As well as combining Neil's songwriting with Gerry's poems, they both enjoy putting their own music to selected work from other poets with Celtic roots.
  • Andy Thorburn, a classically trained pianist, he has immersed himself in Scottish traditional music for many years, playing keyboards and accordion in a huge variety of bands including Mouth Music, Wolfstone, Ceolbeg and many others.
  • Simon Thoumire, an acknowledged concertina virtuoso and smallpiper, has dazzled audiences with his playing all over his native country and across Europe, Canada and the USA, both as a solo artist and with his trio "The Simon Thoumire Three".
  • Thunderdog Ceilidh Band, weddings, parties, festivals, ceilidhs, etc. Thunderdog Ceilidh Band play a wide variety of dances and can turn our music to rock, jazz, reggae, bluegrass when required.
  • David Vernon and Dick Lee, displaying dazzling musicianship, they take you on a musical journey around the world, having absorbed influences from all corners of the globe. From the high energy Jewish hora and Gypsy rhythms, to the sublime Tango and Musette waltz, hot fiery Balkan melodies and light Classical, Jazz and traditional music, they intertwine melody and harmony with consumate ease, offering a repertoire as exciting and varied as their undoubted talents.
  • Wardlaw Scottish Dance Band, music for Scottish Country Dances, Ceilidhs, Weddings, Birthday Parties, Scottish Nights, Burns Nights etc. etc..
  • The Waterboys, are a folk-rock group led by Scotsman Mike Scott. The style and membership changed dramatically through the life of the group, revolving always around Scott. It started as a 'big music' (their own term) rock group, then moved to Ireland where they took on a more folky, lyrical sound:
  • Sheena Wellington, Scotland's leading traditional singer, Her repertoire covers everything from Burns to ballads to the best of contemporary songwriting, drawing from the rich Scottish tradition passed from musician to musician through the ages.
  • Gary West is a skilful performer on various species of Scottish bagpipe.
  • The Whistlebinkies, formed during the great surge of interest in traditional and Celtic music and song in the late 1960s, were the first group to combine the three national instruments: the fiddle, bagpipes and clarsach (small Scottish harp) in regular performance. The repertory is drawn from all periods of Scottish music and from all regions of the country. Members contribute new compositions within the tradition and the group is always ready to explore connections with other cultures.
  • Wild Thistle Stories & Songs, celebration of Scottish history & culture, free mp3 downloads by Port Glasgow songwriter John McCloskey (The Rainman), info & links to Inverclyde & Glasgow Songwriters, trad folk-song lyrics.
  • Wolfstone, from its birth in 1989 the band has followed its very own Highland roots and delivered the passion that is contained within them onto the international stage. Wolfstone draw from the very foundations of Highland music, wild tunes, beautiful airs and powerful songs and the unique blend of guitars, fiddle, bagpipes and pulsating percussion combined with a dynamic stage presence, are all well-known hallmarks of the band.
  • Wrigley Sisters, combining mastery with mischief, tradition with modernity, and technical maturity with youthful freshness, Jennifer (fiddle) and Hazel Wrigley (guitar and piano) are two of the fastest-rising stars on today's international folk circuit. Their music play from the heart about Orkney Islands and is a sparkling blend of traditional, contemporary and original material, invigorated with jazz, blues and ragtime flavours
  • Zuba's music is a multi-cultural, multi-lingual testament to hope, optimism and joy. Bringing together a cornucopia of influences from around the world, Zuba have fused the global rhythms underpinning the band-members' different backgrounds to form a harmonious musical celebration of 21st century cultural diversity. The music is global-fusion, world-pop, or any of a myriad of blanket terms that can be cobbled together to describe a melting pot of West African pop, Spanish soul, Hebridean hi-life, Caribbean folk and Latin American polyrhythms.
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* Serbia
  • Pesmarica Jugoslovenske Starogradske Muzike, The Book of Old City Songs from Yugoslavia, a fine collection of lyrics for 100 traditional songs from Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia and Macedonia, with information about bands and singers.

  • Teofilovic Twins, Ratko and Radisa, are unique performers of ancient Serbian and Balkan music. During their fifteen years of preparations - before they finally decided to break the silence and appear on European ethno scene - they have solved the "mystery of the second voice," and found long lost harmonies of traditional singing.
  • Trio Balkan Strings, performs its original instrumental music, a fusion of many Balkan elements: Serbian, Gypsy, Romanian, Bulgarian, Moldavian, Macedonian, Greek, Turkish, Oriental ... including some Jazz improvisations and classical guitar elements. That is why the music is so fresh, more interesting than any of them separately. Their music is like a handmade carpet, colorful and full of beautiful ornaments, but when you look more carefully and closely, you will see all the beauty of colors and art of every single pattern, thread and string woven in.
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* Slovakia
  • Banda, this band, playing Slovak traditional music, was created in 2003. The five musicians put a modern slant on Slovak root's music and the very colourful history of Slovak traditional music. They interpret traditional Slovak songs with world music arrangements and influences.
  • Dunaág Folk-Dance Chamber Ensemble + Zöld Pántlika Orchestra, they work up the songs, music sometimes the traditions of parts of Slovakia inhabited with Hungarians and parts inhabited with other nationalities.
  • Ghýmes Ensemble, they are members of the large ethnic Hungarian minority which resides in the regions of Slovakia. The members of Ghýmes believe strongly in the universality and binding strength of music to transcend cultural and linguistic boundaries and bring us ever closer to global harmony.
  • Keltieg, traditional Celtic music, (in Slovakian)
  • Nerez, in their music influences from all over Central Europe conjured nicely with Gypsy, Jewish and Spanish folklore. (in Slovak)
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* Slovenia
  • Etnoploc, the band members come from the Italian-Slovenian region between Trieste and Nova Gorica. They mix melodies from the Balkans with Klezmer and popular Russian music, but also Argentinian "tangos", Gospel and Blues. (in Italian and Slovenian) new!
  • Katice, 11 girls singing traditional Slovene folk songs.
  • Orlek, ethno-folk-rock-polka-punk-band.
  • Terra Folk, what they like to play is a mind bogglingly eclectic assortment that includes folk styles as diverse as Klezmer, Gypsy, Irish, Slovenian and even Mexican music, but also extends to pop, rock and classical. One medley manages to include Bach, Led Zeppelin and a Donegal reel!
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* Spain
  • Acetre's work begins with a careful investigation and selection of topics that they themselves collect from the rich oral traditions of Extremadura, then they readapt them with a new breath of fresh air.
  • Aira da Pedra, Celtic folk music from the Bierzo (Leon) region. (in Spanish)
  • Aires de Ronda, traditional music form the Castilla y La Mancha region.
  • Akelarre Agrocelta, seven guys from La Mancha playing their own blend of Celtic music. (in Spanish)
  • Aliara, is born with the aim to discover traditional music from the Valle de los Pedroches, in the Córdoba region. (in Spanish)
  • Aljibe, folk music from the Castilla La Mancha region. (in Spanish)
  • Almacántaro, traditional folk music from the Castilla y León region, played with typical instruments like dulzaina, gaita charra, zanfona, rabel, salterio, and many others. (in Spanish)
  • Almez, traditional Spanish music (mainly Castilla-León, but also Galicia and Asturies) and from other European countries (Ireland, Scotland and France). (in Spanish)
  • El Arroyo los Cagaos, independent folk group from de Caceres. (in Spanish)
  • Atlántica, songs and dance tunes from Cantabria, other celtic nations and origional compositions.
  • Aulaga Folk, traditional music from the Extremadura region. (in Spanish)
  • Azarbe, traditional music from the Sureste Español (aguilandos, jotas, malagueñas, marchas, etc.). (in Spanish)
  • Babieca, traditional music coming from such different places as Scotland, Ireland, Slovakia, Italy, Australia, USA, Israel or Spain, as well as self-developed tunes.
  • Banda Inaudita, this ensemble has the characteristics of a classical chamber music group and the attitudes of a popular band that develops its own style. The repertoire is varied and aimed at a broad range of musical tastes.
  • Berezo, traditional songs and dances mainly from La Vera and Sierra de Gredos (Castilla y León). (in Spanish)
  • Biella Nuei (Aragon), is among the avant-garde of popular music from Aragón: tunes and rhythms such as fandangos, rhumbas, dances (ritual dances), romances, polkas from a contemporary point of view and which sounds as present-day as it is respectful of old-times spirit. Aragon
  • La Braña, traditional music from Léon. (in Spanish)
  • Brandania, Celtic music from Canary Islands. (in Spanish)
  • Brocal, traditional music from the Castilla region. (in Spanish)
  • Agrupación Folclórica Bucio, traditional music and dances from the Canary Islands. (in Spanish)
  • Cambera´l Cierzu, folk music from Cantabria. (in Spanish)
  • Candeal, folk music from the Castilla region. (in Spanish)
  • Celtas Cortos, folk-pop with a lot of Irish music:
  • Contradanza, acoustic trio from Sevilla playing a blend of different traditions and their own compositions. (in Spanish)
  • Graham Davies, is a Spanish-speaking Welsh musician. He has produced a charity CD called "Celta" containing traditional music presented in a modern way, using a 16 track sequencer on digital keyboard. The main influences come from Spain and Wales.
  • Doctor Folk, from Burgos, mix Celtic and contemporary music. (in Spanish)
  • Raul Fernández, El Gaiteru Trasmeranu. (in Spanish)
  • Asociación Folclórica Grupo Fuente Agria, is a vocal and dance group from Puertollano, Ciudad Real, Castilla-La Mancha region. (in Spanish)
  • Gaiteros del Faro's philosophy is the same one that those old pipe bands of ends the century XIX and principles of the century XX, which interpreted songs of the country playing gaitas. They acted in "romerias", religious acts, management festivals, dances, wellcoming of illustrious persons, etc... in the Western valleys of Cantabria mainly.
  • Los Gofiones, traditional music and songs from Las Palmas, Canary Islands. (in Spanish)
  • Miguel Ángel Gómez Naharro, folk singer from the Extremadura region (in Spanish).
  • Grupo Tradicion Albacete, folk music from Albacete and the Castilla-La Mancha region. (in Spanish)
  • Agrupación Folclórica Guanapay, traditional music and dances from Lanzarote, Canary Islands. (in Spanish)
  • L´Ham de Foc, for the first time L'Ham de Foc has worked a very typical style from Valencia into their music: the Cant d´estil. This tradition sounds like Flamenco due to the melismatic melodies. A poet is whispering the lyrics into the singer's ear who improvises over a fixed melodic basis. L'Ham de Foc also works on other traditional rhythms from Spain, like the Jota, and uses archaic and popular percussion like spoons, pots or a wooden table, together with Indian or Middle East percussion.
  • Priscilla Hernández, singer / songwriter from Canary Islands. Haunting, ethereal music and bitter lullabies.
  • La Humera, folk music from Cantabria. (in Spanish)
  • El Hombre Pez, folk-rock group from the Cantabria region: they mix traditional Irish music, African and Latin rhythms, with pop and rock. (in Spanish)
  • Laguneros, traditional music and dances from the Faculty of Mathematics of the Universidad de La Laguna, Lanzarote, Canary Islands. (in Spanish)
  • Luétiga, folk music from Cantabria. (in Spanish)
  • Manantial Folk, Spanish folk music. (in Spanish)
  • La Musgaña, take their music from all over the breadth of Castilla; "from Portugal almost to the Mediterranean":
  • Los Ninos de Los Ojos Rojos, Balkan music, hip hop, fusion, beat box, Irish music. (in Spanish)
  • La Noche de Todos los Santos, Medieval folk from Ceuta. (in Spanish)
  • O'Carolan, play the music of the famous Irish harpist, as well as some traditional piece from Spain, France, and the Central Europe. (in Spanish)
  • Paco Díez y la Bazanca, Iberian traditional and Jewish-Spanish music from the Castilla region.
  • La Parranda de Teror, traditional music from Canary Islands. (in Spanish)
  • Poyo Largo, folk music from La Estrella (Toledo) and the Comarca de la Jara. (in Spanish)
  • Riu Sec, traditional music from the Valencia region. (in Spanish)
  • La Ronda de Boltaña, folk music from Aragon. (in Spanish)
  • Los Sabandeños, folklore from the Canary Island. (in Spanish)
  • Sog, traditional music from Léon. (in Spanish)
  • Son del Cordel, traditional music from the Léon region. (in Spanish)
  • Los Talaos, dulzaineros from Madrid. (in Spanish)
  • Taray Folk, traditional music interpreted with modern instrumentation. From Murcia. (in Spanish)
  • Tres Fan Ball, traditional music from the region of Valencia. (in Valencian)
  • Tirurirus, traditional music form the Aragon region. (in Spanish)
  • Trecho Pindio, tradional music duo from the Castilla region. (in Spanish)
  • Triquel, Celtic rock. (in Spanish)
  • Vozpornoche, folk music from Cantabria. (in Spanish)
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* Sweden
  • Drone Music, is one of Sweden's most influential and celebrated labels. The site contains many info about the top Swedish folk artists.
  • Folknorth.org, directory of Nordic Traditional and Contemporary Folk Music and Dance.
  • Jamtlandica.com - folk music archive, a resource site that will make it possible for you to listen (and play) traditional Folk Music from Jamtland, Sweden.

  • O'tôrgs-Kaisa Abrahamsson, fiddler playing folkmusik from Nordanstig. (in Swedish)
  • Aksak orkestar, Balkan party music. (in Swedish)
  • Alruna, performs ancient Swedish hymns that were once a strong and powerful part of christian everyday life but disappeared about a hundred years ago because it was prohibited to sing that way.
  • Alwa, is firmly rooted within the Swedish folk music tradition without being an out and out folk music group. Their attitude towards sound and form is somewhat akin to that of the bands of the British folk-rock scene of the seventies when mixing the traditional Nordic material with blues, bluegrass and rock. But they also seamlessly incorporates elements of free jazz, west African Youruba music and Cuban Santeria into their music. (in Swedish)
  • Amanecer Worldmusic, plays Swedish, Greek, Turkish, Spanish, Chilean and Irish folk music. (in Swedish)
  • Anders, Andersson & Anderzon, "fiol trio". (in Swedish)
  • Ditte Andersson, she is a singer, and plays fiddle and nyckelharpa. (in Swedish)
  • Lennart Andersson, accordionist. (in Swedish)
  • Edward Anderzon, plays fiddle and nyckelharpa. (in Swedish)
  • Andra Generationen, strong, hot, Swedish Balkan music that knows no borders. The music of Macedonia forms the base of Andra Generationen's music, mixed with Bulgarian turbo folk, Serbian, Greek, Turkish and Gypsy music. This is further blended with a lot of improvisation and influences from modern dance beats to create an irresistible show for the modern World music listener.
  • Atra, play and show dances from their area around Lake Siljan.
  • Avadå, their music is firmly anchored in the rich treasures of Skånsk-Swedish folkmusic tradition.
  • Balalajkaorkestern Kazbek, from Stockholm. (in Swedish)
  • Balkan Art Music, the band was originally formed under the name Biseri in 1998, and played Yugoslavian folkmusic. In the summer of 2000 there was a split and Alex, Ivan, Mile and Senad decided to continue under the new name Balkan Art Music, playing a music that mix of all styles of folkmusik in a modern setting.
  • Banshee, is a music group formed in Norrköping in 1997, and plays Irish traditional folkmusic.
  • B.A.R.K., Ethno-digital folk music. Scandinavian folk music instruments share the sound waves with drum machines and samplers, and out comes Scandinavian folk music in its digitised form; samples of the old Lapp woman's voice echoes through the processor, and old songs from medieval times are brought back to life.
  • Barka Vall, from Åland, plays etno-folkrock, a kind of metal mixed with medieval songs and instruments.
  • Barozda, Hungarian folk music from Transylvania. (in Swedish)
  • Bäsk, consists of flautist Jonas Simonson, saxophonist/percussionist Sten Kallman and fiddler Hans Kennemark. This unique instrumentation brings a freshness to their music, which arranges original and traditional melodies originally intended for solo fiddle into acoustic trio pieces. (in Swedish)
  • Bazar Blå, plays tranceglobal tripfolk; their own, new folk music with influences from all the world.
  • Jenny Beck, official home of this talented Swedish singer/songwriter. Her songs range from folk/pop to country/rock.
  • Bengt Berger, is a drummer and percussionist with a 40-year old interest in what is now called World Music. Originally a jazz drummer, his own music has become heavily influenced by Hindustani, Karnatic and West African musics which I studied during some years in India and Ghana.
  • Mats Berglund, plays fiddle, accordion and the harjedalspipa. He grew up in Varmland, and plays a mixture of traditional music from the Swedish and Norwegian sides of the Varmland border, including a region known as Finnskogen.
  • Bhean Bheag, Celtic music from the forests of Småland. (in Swedish)
  • Bjärv, from the back provinces of Sweden comes this folk trio, whose music reawakens traditional and ancient melodies with innovative harmonies and rousing vocals. Trained at the prestigious Eric Sahlström Institute, the three are considered among the finest young Swedish folk musicians on guitar, fiddle and nyckelharpa.
  • Björk-Tagel, traditional music group. (in Swedish)
  • Björn Björn, he has been double World Champion in the gammelharpa class (silverbasharpa) 1998 and 2002. He also builds nyckelharpas, hurdy-gurdys, etc, and sells other instruments and accessories.
  • Björnligan, gammeldans band. (in Swedish)
  • Blå Bergens Borduner, in the group plays Anders Stake (Norrude) before he moved into Hedningarna. Some blazing mostly dance tunes - some of which are part of the repertoire of many dance bands today. (in Swedish)
  • Blackthorn, is a Stockholm-based band which plays traditional Irish music.
  • Blårävarna, traditional music group. (in Swedish)
  • Ulrika Bodén, is one of the most well known young folksingers in Sweden today. Ulrika is a founder member of the group Ranarim playing both traditional songs and their own music. On her solo albums she has presented an unknown repertoire from her homearea, songs that she has learnt from old people in Ångermanland.
  • Boys From County Hell, Irish music. (in Swedish)
  • Brassfabriken, Balkan band from Göteborg. (in Swedish)
  • Bråvikens Balalajkor, Russian music from Norrköping. (in Swedish)
  • Bromans Blandning, traditional music. (in Swedish)
  • Bro Spelmän, traditional music group. (in Swedish)
  • Leif Carr, folkmusic from Skåne. (in Swedish)
  • Lennart Carlsson, his main instrument is the violin. First classical trained, then he has specialized in the Swedish folk tunes of province Småland.
  • The Corbies, the oldest and most renowned Scottish and Irish folkgroup in Sweden.
  • Dalalåtar, play folk music from the province of Dalarna, for dance and entertainment. They also provide dance shows and instruction. (in Swedish)
  • The Dancing Masters, is a Swedish early music group playing the music of the Playford editions, i.e. English country dances from the 17th century.
  • Dans Brothers, violin duo. (in Swedish)
  • Dråm, musicians Erik Ask-Upmark and Anna Rynefors are both riksspelmän and combine ancient instruments to create new sophisticated sounds centered around the traditional and unique Swedish instrument nyckelharpa together with the Celtic folk harp. Swedish and medieval bagpipes provide the endless drone.
  • Draupner, plays a glorious assortment of traditional tunes from all over Hälsingland as well as a number of the group's own compositions. An excellent mixture of impressive music of this province from past and present. A mixture showing us that the folk music traditions of Hälsingland are just as alive and in good hands now as in olden days.
  • Duo Decima, Martin Hillbratt & Karin Eriksson, fiddles. (in Swedish)
  • Eitre, is an Irish, French, and Swedish conglomerate united in the cause of Irish music. A spectacular five piece band who have their own interpretation of Irish traditional music.
  • Lars-Olof Ejstes, Dalarna fiddler plays solo a mix of tunes from Dalarna, other parts of Sweden, and original compositions. (in Swedish)
  • electric folk, folk rock inspired by Swedish and English folk music.
  • Elin & Edward, Elin Skoglund and Edward Anderzon are certified tradition bearers, of music from the provinces of Uppland and Södermanland in Eastern Sweden. They work as musicians and teachers all over the country. Both play several types of nyckelharpa and Edward also plays the violin.
  • Anna Elwing (Elwingen), singer and fiddler. (in Swedish)
  • Jens Engelbrecht, mandola, guitar player as a soloist or with several Swedish groups (Ranarim, Sofia Sanden Trio, Ulrika Boden, etc.).
  • Engmans Kapell, Folk rock band from Hälsingland. (in Swedish)
  • Ove Engström, is part of the elite of Swedish troubadours and is well-known from his performances on Radio Viking. (in Swedish)
  • Erika och Cecilia, Erika Lindgren, fiddle and Cecilia Österholm nyckelharpa. (in Swedish)
  • Jeanette Eriksson, fiddler. (in Swedish)
  • Staffan Eriksson & Brodd Leif Andersson, play traditional music from Dalarna.
  • Eva & Gjert, Eva Blume and Gjert Magnusson play traditional music from Bohuslän. (in Swedish)
  • Eva Tjörnebo & Viskompaniet, is one of Sweden's best known folk singers, and for more than twenty years she has collected and researched Sweden's vast treasure of folk songs, visiting many older singers in the process. (in Swedish)
  • Fatang, plays traditional folk music from the province of Uppland as well as their own new compositions. Their mix of nyckelharpa, modern electric bass / guitar, and an exotic variety of percussion makes for an exciting sound with limitless possibilities. Their intense and imaginative music is full of magical resonance and inviting dance rhythms. (in Swedish)
  • Faust, drone music with its roots in Dalsland and Bohuslän. Short excursions to France and own compositions create a very varied program.
  • Alban Faust, is one of the most important Swedish nyckelharpa and bagpipes player/instrument makers. For more than two decades he has played in different bands, as well as making solo performances on the European scenes.
  • Felspel, traditional folk group from Lindesberg. (in Swedish)
  • Jörgen Fischer, plays the uilleann pipes.
  • Fomp, is a folk music and dance constellation of five young musicians playing contemporary Swedish folk music.
  • Lotta Franzen, is considered to be one of the leading key fiddle and fiddle players in Sweden.
  • Göran "Freddy" Fredrikson, has played Swedish and Irish music on the bouzouki since 1983. Freddy played with several groups, including Blå Bergens Borduner, Norrsken, Svart Kaffe, Ådra, and Christy O'Leary Band. Freddy has recently started playing again with his old friend Anders Norudde (Blå Bergens Borduner and Hedningarna).
  • Daniel Fredriksson , mandola player from Umeå. He is onvolved in several musical projects, i.e. Godrun, Petterson/Fredriksson, Sintram, Alison Gross. (in Swedish)
  • Frifot, brings together three of the most colourful characters on the Swedish folk scene, all of them with deep roots in the folk tradition.
  • Fylgja, a fusion between Scandinavian tradition and the rest of the world.
  • Fyrland, was formed by four Swedish folk music students at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm. Initially they worked with a short-term project arranging music to accompany story telling. The result was sound collages and improvisation woven with traditional Swedish melodies and original compositions. Once the project was over they had all become so inspired that they decided to continue playing together, working along the same lines, but as a concert band.
  • Galder, folk rock band. (in Swedish)
  • Olle Gällmo, he plays traditional music (on Swedish bagpipe) from most parts of Sweden, but in particular from Dalarna (where the instrument has its roots) and Uppland
  • Galway Express, Irish music in Stockholm. (in Swedish)
  • Gårk, Swedish music. (in Swedish)
  • Garmarna, with roots firmly planted in Nordic folk music, they create their own music influenced by the rock tradition they've all grown up with.
  • Giron, play a mixture of Sami folkmusic, rock and jazz.
  • Godrun's music is hard to define. It's dirty and garagesmelling with influences from rock, punk and nordic folkmusic, yet littered with adhesive poplike choruses and cunning lyrics. Sampled beats are mixed with traditional folk-instruments, often heavily distorted or processed.
  • Gorm, folk-metal from the forests of Järvsö. (in Swedish)
  • Gravrost, plays folk music and music from the Viking age and the Middle ages. (in Swedish)
  • Groupa, plays it's own brand of modern Swedish folk music based on a great and tender caring for the tradition, coupled with refined musical skills.
  • Grovjobb, is a Gothenburg based band playing a mix between Swedish folkmusic and progressive jazz-rock, with psychedelic influences.
  • Gunnfjauns kapell, folk music from Gotland, Sweden.
  • Anders Hagberg, Anders Hagberg has played with a great number of Scandinavian musicians and groups ranging from rock and jazz to folk music and modern ballet. With his roots firmly planted in Scandinavia he mixes jazz with various elements from diverse musical cultures into a personal and exciting sound.
  • Hagen, is the ultimate meltdown of ancient Swedish folklore and modern Metal. It's a collision at full speed which provides a violent and powerful impact. Suddenly the silent beauty of the mighty woods arises and you find yourself floating into the mist, surrounded by elves and trolls.
  • Maria L Hallengren, she is a singer and nyckelharpa player. (in Swedish)
  • Härfågel, plays folkmusic from Sweden, Norway, France and the British Isles. (in Swedish)
  • Harpliran, harpliran trio. (in Swedish)
  • Harpolirarna is a group (from the little town Eslöv in southern Sweden) of about 10 people, who play folk music on nyckelharpa and other instruments.
  • Harv, is centered on two of Sweden's newest and exciting young fiddlers. With the long-standing folk fiddle duet tradition as their starting point, Magnus Stinnerbom and Daniel Sandén-Warg bring energy, attitude, and new ideas to the mix.
  • Johan Hedin, is a musician who has taken the nyckelharpa to completely new ground. Hedin plays specially built nyckelharpas of his own design, which open up new means of expression on this instrument.
  • Peter Puma Hedlund, Swedish folk music with one of the most experienced Swedish Nyckelharpa player.
  • Hedningarna, is a Swedish/Finnish group that plays music with roots in the old Swedish/Finnish history, making a whole new category of European music:
  • Axel Herjö, fiddler. (in Swedish)
  • Herr Arnes Penningar, play Scandinavian traditional music, using instruments from different worlds like the Swedish bagpipe, cello, guitar, recorder, fiddle and Appalachian dulcimer. This band uses exciting acoustic sounds to bring the treasure trove of Nordic songs, as well as the old polskas and springlek tunes of Western Dalecarlia and Eastern Norway into the 21st century - but they don't hesitate letting both Celtic and Balkan influences shine through.
  • Karin Högheilm, has a fantastic voice with an immense range. She sings the deepest alto sounds with the same ease as the highest tones a person can produce. Karin's music is an eclectic mix of avant-garde chamber music with various traditional music influences: Swedish folk, Medieval, Celtic, and even some other indefinable influences.
  • Hoven Droven, is a folk music band who performs with the attitude of a metal group:
  • Hulling, plays traditional Swedish music, but they have a growing number of original compositions. The music is in the newer tradtition of swedish folk-music without losing touch with the older tradition.
  • Imma, is a young Swedish group who plays some kind of new folkmusic. The members of the band are spread from the south to the very north of the long country, but with a will of steel, Imma still keeps going. (in Swedish)
  • Irmelin, traditional folk song in untraditional arrangements for three women's voices. (in Swedish)
  • James' Gate, a group of Swedish musicians with a long and rewarding interest in Irish traditional music.
  • Jansson & Sjöberg, folk rock. (in Swedish)
  • Jonssonlinjen och Polskecirkusen. (in Swedish)
  • Jord, young folk music group from Kiruna. (in Swedish)
  • JP Nyströms, play music based on traditional northern Swedish pieces collected and noted down by members of the group, and a broader range of folk music and compositions by the group.
  • Kalabra, Swedish folk music meets jazz, blues, pop and African sounds. (in Swedish)
  • Lars Karlsson, is an accordion player, touring and performing a lot around in Northern Europe. Both with "Lars Karlsson Band", as a solo artist or together with other top accordionists. His repertoare is very mixed, from traditional accordion music / folklore music, swing, tango, march music etc., to blues, rock & cajun.
  • Sofia Karlsson, folk singer. (in Swedish)
  • Kebnekajse, folk rock band. (in Swedish)
  • Kelenn, French and Celtic folk. (in Swedish)
  • King Laoghaire, is a group of five people who share a mutual interest in Irish/Celtic traditional and ballad music.
  • Klacklek, provides energetic, playful and danceable folk music. Their repertoire is dominated by tunes from Värmland and Dalarna. (in Swedish)
  • Klarskinn, losely formed backyard orchestra centered around bandleader Anders Åborg. Rustic style punk and folkmusic without folklore, classic rock from the eighteen hundreds and chapbook songs for new chaps.
  • Klinga, plays a combination of new and traditional tunes - often originating in the northwestern Swedish regions of Jämtland or Härjedalen. Rhythmically complex polska tunes (traditional three-beat dance music), beautiful waltzes and ancient wedding marches.
  • Klintetten, folk music from Linköping. (in Swedish)
  • Klockrike Kapell, folk music from Östergötland. (in Swedish)
  • Knafver, folk music. (in Swedish)
  • Komp I Slaget, play their own tunes - new Swedish folk music. (in Swedish)
  • Krack, folkmusic from the Ireland, England and the Northern Countries.
  • Kraja, is a vocal quartet from Umeå. (in Swedish)
  • Krajs, folk rock band based in Lidköping. (in Swedish)
  • Pär Kristoffersson, plays Irish music on uilleann pipes.
  • Kulturkometen, "Levande musik & Historiska event". (in Swedish)
  • Laplandian Highlanders, plays folkmusic from Ireland and Scotland.
  • Låtbolaget, Swedish folk tunes. (in Swedish)
  • Lavalåt, Swedish folkmusic. (in Swedish)
  • Martin Lignell och Levande Krabbor, Irish songs in Swedish. (in Swedish)
  • Boe Lindberg, Swedish music on Swedish bagpipes. (in Swedish)
  • Hasse Ljungdahl, plays Irish music on uilleann pipes and whistle.
  • Lure, is the new name for the group which used to be called Valramn. Lure's repertoire is mostly based on traditional music from Southern Sweden. Even though they change their instrumentation between tunes, the sound of Lure remains distinct. (in Swedish)
  • Lysnen, young and innovative folk rock. (in Swedish)
  • MacLowlives, Gothenburg-based group playing traditional Irish and Scottish music.
  • Madame Neruda, Irish folk music. (in Swedish)
  • Mallt, Swedish and Irish folk music. (in Swedish)
  • Malström, trio with fiddle, clarinet and guitar. (in Swedish)
  • Malva, Swedish folk music with jazz, pop and rock influences. (in Swedish)
  • Theofilos Markopoulos, Greek music and dance in Gothenburg. (in Swedish)
  • Måskapellet, folk music from Småland. (in Swedish)
  • Mats & Brudarna, traditional music from fra Trøndelagsfylkene, Nordmøre, and Nordfjord of Sweden. (in Swedish)
  • Gunnel Mauritzson, born on the Baltic isle of Gotland, she is a leading female voice on the Swedish folk scene. Tinged with an austere Baltic beauty, Mauritzson's music is a personal combination of Swedish folk, Balkan, classical and jazz influences.
  • Meraklides, Greek rebetika music. (in Swedish)
  • Molly Maguires, Irish music from Piteå. (in Swedish)
  • Mountain Dew, plays a variety of rock, pop, traditional Irish music and original material.
  • Kalle Moraeus, fiddle player from Orsa. (in Swedish)
  • Meshanga, a band from Hälsingland inspired by traditional music. (in Swedish)
  • The Murray Pipes & Drums, is basically a traditional Scottish pipe band. The group also experimented with music not traditionally played on the bagpipe, such as Swedish polska, western art music, jazz etc.
  • Musikgruppen Raa, started out playing worldmusic in the 70s and are still on the road. Some call them the Swedish answer to The Incredible String Band.
  • Nätt o Jämt, Lars Fredriksson, Ylva Persson, Kerstin Ingels, and Stefan Öberg play traditional music. (in Swedish)
  • Norrlåtar, their main source of inspiration is the old traditional music from the very north of Sweden, but their music is a spicy mixture of influences.
  • Norrtelje Elitkapell, folk music quarter playing traditional music from Uppländ. (in Swedish)
  • N.o.r.t.h, Ambient Folk Pop.
  • Nyckelharpsfolket, traditional music. (in Swedish)
  • Christy O'Leary, has been performing Irish traditional music professionally playing for the past 35 years. Based in Sweden, Christy can be booked in a duo with guitar/bouzouki or with a new trio - O'Leary, Tweed, and Deivert.
  • Göran Ohlsson, fiddler and dancer from Jämtland.
  • Christy O'Leary, is a piper and singer from Kerry, Ireland, but based in Sweden, that has been performing Irish traditional music professionally for the past 35 years.
  • Orientexpressen, Balkan music. (in Swedish)
  • Orust, new folk music with roots from the Orust Island. The traditional music from Orust, is a fusion of culture influence from Shetland, Orkney and the rest of the British Isles and also Sweden and Norway.
  • Östanvind, come from the towns of Hållnäs and Tierp in the province of Uppland. The group's repertoire consists mostly of unaccompanied Swedish folk songs. They write their own arrangements in four part woman's voices and also sing arrangements by such arrangers as Jan-Åke Hillerud. (in Swedish)
  • Östblocket, Balkan brass music. (in Swedish)
  • Pax, Anders Bergfjord and Edward Anderzon play '700-'800 music for nyckelharpa, vevlira, säckpipa and other instruments. (in Swedish)
  • Åke Persson, fiddle player from Skåne. (in Swedish)
  • Harald Pettersson, plays hurdy-gurdy, bagpipe, willow flute, bowed lyre, accordion, piano and organ. (in Swedish)
  • Kristofer Pettersson, his main instrument is silverbasharpa, which is the 19th century type of nyckelharpa. His repertoire mainly contains older folk music from the region of Uppland and a lot of slängpolska tunes from Småland. Beside his silverbasharpa playing, he also plays Hungarian and Transylvanian folk music on hurdy-gurdy and kontra (three-stringed viola).
  • Pettersson & Fredriksson, modern folk music for nyckelharpa and mandola. (in Swedish)
  • Philia, traditional music on two saxophones. (in Swedish)
  • The Pipes & Drums of the 1st Royal Engineers, Sweden's oldest and most prosperous pipe band.
  • Pireus, Greek folk music. (in Swedish)
  • Plan 3, spiced up Swedish folkmusic. (in Swedish)
  • Plumber Boys, is an Irish music band playing Irish rock/folkmusic. Songs are mostly written by the band but a few covers are performed.
  • Polka Twisters, plays a powerful mix of new and old South Scandinavian folksongs and instrumentals, in a style that is influenced by Cajun, TexMex and R&B from New Orleans.
  • Pork From Cork, Irish music from Östergötland. (in Swedish)
  • Quilty, play traditional Irish music with a strong personal touch. Whirling jigs, reels, hornpipes and polkas and songs of love, emigration and adventures are interwoven to create a colourful concert with many surprising and exciting musical experiences.
  • RÅmantik, you might call it ethno, folk, world or trad. RÅmantik is playing heavy and beatiful Swedish folkmusic using saxophone, accordion and percussion.
  • Ranarim, someone call them "the Abba of traditional music". Some songs are traditional, some newly composed, and together the group develops the final arrangements to create their distinctive sound. (in Swedish)
  • Raun, is a new arrival in the Nordic folk music genre, who with their intensive beat and discriminating nudity bring us "back to the future". Raun laces the tradition with big city pulse trash beat and their own tunes.
  • Ville Roempke, is a musician, writer, lecturer and radio producer living in Östersund, Jamtland. He plays music in the tradition from Lapp-Nils, the most famous and distinguished folk fiddler in the province, and he has learned this style from five fiddlers from Offerdal and Hotagen, all born at the end of the nineteenth century.
  • Susanne Rosenberg, folk singer. (in Swedish)
  • Rosenbergs Sjua, Swedish polyphonic folksong with a unique sound you've never heard before, far from traditional choral arrangements.
  • Rotvälta, from Swedish-speaking parts of Finland. They have found folk music on phonograph cylinders recorded at the beginning of this century, which included a style of fiddle playing with a special drive, and unique two-part singing, influenced by eastern European traditions. (in Swedish)
  • Per O. G. Runberg, Swedish musician, artist and entertainer. He plays Scandinavian music on several kind of instruments, such as tagelharpa, hurdy-gurdy, lyre, jaw harp, Swedish bagpipes, traditional pipes and flutes made of wood, bone or bark, animal horns, lur.
  • Eva Åström Rune, specializes in the Swedish vocal tradition in its many forms: herding calls, ballads, hymns, dance songs etc. Being a free-lance musician, she works in different contexts such as tours with music groups, theatre productions, and she also teaches and composes. As a composer, she moves in a range between the traditional Swedish folk styles and contemporary styles without boundaries.
  • Sälta, Swedish folkmusic ensemble.
  • Sofia Sandén, singer and fiddler. (in Swedish)
  • Sarek, plays a combination of pop, disco and folk music.
  • Sintram, is a successful mix of musicians and music from Värmland (the county of deep forests and bewildering music) and Västerbotten (the county of vast areas and bewitching sentimentality). In these isolated areas, people have been playing and dancing the music through generations. Now, their music is brought into the 21st century by Sintram, carefully but independently interpreted by three musicians of today. (in Swedish)
  • Sklep, plays Swedish and Irish folk(rock) music. (in Swedish)
  • Skrå, traditional music from Åland. (in Swedish)
  • Skrömta, Swedish folk music. (in Swedish)
  • Snabba Ryck, is an entertainment and "gammeldans" group which plays music from around 1900. (in Swedish)
  • Snödriva, is a music group based in Umeå, in the north of Sweden. The music is a fusion of the vocalist Inger Anna's joik, and music with inspiration from all corners of the world. All framed by a modern touch.
  • Södra Bergens Balalaikor / South Mountain Balalaljka Orchestra, is a swedish orchestra that plays and sings Russian and other estern music.
  • Sorkar & Strängar's influences are derived from music from the 12th century all the way to the song traditions of the 20th century, mostly from the Nordic countries, but also from Ireland and Balkan. The lyrics describes Erborigian life, a self made fantasy world. (in Swedish)
  • Lasse Sörlin, is a versatile musician with genuine traditional Swedish folkmusic as speciality. He has a longtime experience as musician and composer in theatre, he educate in traditional Swedish fiddlemusic and smaller ensembles at workshops and schools, and participate as a studio musician in genres as jazz/pop/rock/country.
  • Spelmanskvartetten Folia, is s folk music quartet formed in the eighties in the city of Malmö.
  • Spelmanslag, is a Swedish and a Norwegian word that means "player's group", but it has come to mean "fiddler's group". A Scandinavian massed fiddle orchestra includes some dozen fiddlers, as well as other instruments:
  • Spúkah Gúma, play a mix between Balkan folkmusik and modern pop/rock music.
  • Kersti Ståbi, singer and storyteller. Swedish/Scandinavian folkmusic and folksongs, and stories from both heaven and hell. (in Swedish)
  • Stamp Från Kön, Swedish, Irish and American folk music. (in Swedish)
  • Stark Lomma, tunes from Dalsland. (in Swedish)
  • Maria Stellas, Greek singer. (in Swedish)
  • Sten, Swedish folk music. (in Swedish)
  • Stockholm Lisboa Project, musicians from Portugal and Sweden joined to communicate their music traditions. Distant in space, under the universal language of music they found new textures and bridges between North and South, one tradition and the other. The repertoire is about Portuguese and Scandinavian folk music, from Fado songs to Polska dances.
  • Stockholms Bulgariska Damkör, a Bulgarian ladies' Choir from Stockholm. (in Swedish)
  • Bengt Sundberg, plays Swedish bagpipes.
  • Süperstar Orkestar, is a wind-band with traditional music from the Balkans on the repertoire (Macedonia, Serbia, Greece and Bulgaria among the others). They play coceks, oros, tsiftetelis, tunes in 7/8, 9/8, and 11/8 and also some original material in a traditional style.
  • Svanevit, Swedish traditional music with a medieval sound. (in Swedish)
  • Svart Kaffe, mix French accordion moustaches (Jean-Pierre Yvert) and West-Swedish fiddle tradition with song (Louise Schultz), guitar, harmonica and mandola (Simon Stålspets) to get Svart Kaffe, Swedish folk music in a traditional and modern style.
  • SWÅP, a breath-taking exchange of Swedish, Irish and British musics ...
  • Taximi, is formed in 1989, sing in Greek and play traditional Greek instrument like Bouzouki and baglamas. The eight (sometimes more) musicians appear in both smal and larger circumstances, on radio and TV, at concerts and intimate parties.
  • The Thistle Pipe Band, is a Swedish Pipes and Drums unit, with its HQ and stores at the Royal Military Academy of Karlberg in Stockholm. As a pattern, the band uses the looks and routines of a Pipes and Drums unit within the British Army and, consequently, stresses the importance, besides playing, of a first-class parade ground drill.
  • Hanna Tibell, she work as free lance traditional musician and fiddle teacher. (in Swedish)
  • Triakel's repertoire is mainly turn of the century, traditional songs of the Jämtland region, complemented with selections from various other parts of Sweden.
  • Trio Moivi, tries to use the yoik's tonal expression together with musical instruments - a true "Mission Impossible", as the yoik follows no musical rules, and often has a rhythm that cannot be described in sheet music.
  • Trolltyg, Sara Johansson and Frida Mangs play Swedish folk music on fiddle and do workshops in Swedish folk dance.
  • Tullamore Brothers, Irish folk music from Örebro. (in Swedish)
  • Två Fisk och en Fläsk, was formed in '94 as an acoustic trio with the intention to play medieval music. That intention is still there, but the form of a trio showed too limited and they are now six members. The material has up to now mostly consisted of medieval ballads from Sweden, but also music from other parts of Europe and from more recent times.
  • Twärdrag, Nordic traditional music from Umeå. (in Swedish)
  • Urga, is a band whose roots are in rock, ska, reggae, folk music, dub and punk! (in Swedish)
  • Valramn, see also Lure (new name).
  • Väsen, their music is based on traditional Swedish folk music, blended with inspiration gained from jazz and rock music and finally topped off with their instrumental talent.
  • Vurpa, creates contemporary Swedish folk music with great curiosity and energy. Inspiration is drawn from the traditional music of Sweden and other countries alike, as well as from mediaeval music. With voices, strings, flutes and percussion, Vurpa builds a musical world where comedy, dramatic storytelling and reflections on life mix and co-exist.
  • The Waves, Irish folk rock band. (in Swedish)
  • Weltklang, Stockholm based Balkan band. (in Swedish)
  • West of Eden, is not a chemically pure Celtic group. They flirt with pop in a well-balanced way, which only adds more riches to their offering.
  • Wynja, folk rock band. (in Swedish)
  • Zenith of Zeal, is a band that mixes rock and pop music with irish influences, but there are also other kind of folkmusic influences in it. (in Swedish)
  • Zenner & Greiner, a Swedish Early music and folk music duo. They take their inspiration from the Medieval and Renaissance periods and from the rich tradition of Scandinavian folk music.
  • Britta Zetterström, singer. (in Swedish)
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* Switzerland
  • folkmusic.ch, information about folk music in and around Switzerland.
  • Volksmusiknet.ch, Folklore and news from Switzerland - non stop live-stream with real Swiss Music, Catalog with CD novelties and many other.

  • Agrar-Rock.ch, are a combination of rural music of Switzerland and rock music. This results in a unique sound you may not have heard before.
  • Alderbuebe, from Urnäsch (Appenzell), are a typical Swiss Folkmusic. They plays also Music, from other parts of the World. (in German)
  • An Lár, is known for pushing forward the boundaries of Celtic music with much respect for its heritage. Their mixture of Irish, Scottish and Breton music with their original songs and tunes, is full of stylistic sense. Varied instrumentation, arrangements for several voices, surprising changes of mood and rhythm and the energetic sound are part of the typical features of this six piece band.
  • Appenzeller Echo, traditional string band sound, hammered dulcimer music, accordion music, yodeling / rolling coins with the special vessels, Swiss Alphorn sound. They play old music titles, own compositions, folkmusic titles from different regions of the world in various rhythm.
  • Appezeller Frauestriichmusig, four women playing Appenzeller music. (in German)
  • Beyond the Fields, plays its own distinctive mixture of Irish and American folk traditions with rock and funk elements. The music moves from quiet acoustic folk sounds all the way to heavy drums and distorted electric guitars.
  • Bow Triplets, instead of playing merely the well known groovy side of the Irish music, they are always aiming at presenting all aspects of Celtic music. Ancient laments are mixed with contemporary compositions, rhythmic instrumental jigs, reels and hornpipes with melancholic magic.
  • Albin Brun, in his different musical projects he develops a music between jazz and new traditional/world music, also by using the instruments of the Swiss alpine tradition. (in German)
  • Doppelbock, "living urban Swiss Folkmusic". (in German)
  • Duo di Morcote, was founded in 1991 to play traditional music principally from Ticino, the southern side of Switzerland and also to play classical music written for two mandolins (or for mandolin and mandola).
  • Elandir, the repertoire of Elandir is made up of mainly traditional Irish songs and tunes, and some personal compositions. The choice of the music is clearly influenced by the current Irish traditional scene (by groups like Dervish, Danù, the Bothy Band, Lunasà). Bringing together each member's musical influences has resulted in an extremely varied repertoire which has delighted audiences with their music, dance and song.
  • Figurás Hungarian Folkdance Ensemble, was founded in 1983 with the specific aim to study, dance and pass on, via perfomances and courses, authentic Hungarian folk dances.
  • firau, are six musicians from Central Switzerland playing "Swiss rhythm'n'folk", a style for people who like it genuine and yet modern with a touch of melancholy, traditional and nevertheless unique. Swiss (traditional) folk music played with rhythms of Brazil, Cuba and elsewhere complemented with a good deal of improvisation are the ingredients of this groovy Latin-Folk-Music.
  • Follchlore, plays a mixture of Swiss "Ländler" music and international folk music (Scandinavian Irish, Scottish). Inspired by the liveliness of different musical directions, Follchlore arranges melodies on typical Swiss musical instruments. (in German)
  • Fränzlis da Tschlin, improvisations, baroque elements, blues and traditional music. An exciting crossover, which never denies their Engadin roots. (in German)
  • Ilario Garbani, his love for the piva is deeply rooted and originates in the research on the traditional music and songs of the Onsernone Valley where the instrument is nowadays only a faint memory whispered by few elderly. He performs in duo with other pipers, above all in the Christmas-time.
  • Glen of Guinness, Celtic music. (in German and French)
  • Hanneli-Musig, traditional Swiss Folk Music played in a fresh and cheerful manner. (in German)
  • Hydromel, their music is influenced by the sound created by Alan Stivell in the Seventies and draws its sources from the traditional repertoire of Brittany and Ireland. The explosive magic of the colors of the ocean, swept by the wind, an expanse of ferns, magic spell of the mountains of Switzerland, Celtic roots, spell-binding rhythms, tribal dancing: their music invites participation. (in French)
  • Inish, 3 musicians, 2 Swiss and one from Ireland but all share the same love of Irish music and culture. They try to play Irish music as authentic as possible and try to distance themselves from the over used drinking pub songs. They play jigs, reels, slides, polkas and a mixture of traditional and contemporary songs.
  • La Joyeuse, consists of nine musicians from the Valais region of Switzerland, who share a common love for Celtic music. Their repertoire is arranged by the group, to compliment the various instruments: violin, guitars, flutes, low whistle, percussion, accordion and uilleann pipes. La Joyeuse invite you to enjoy melodies ranging from Breton dances to fast moving Irish reels and jigs. (in French)
  • Richard Koechli, is regarded as one of the best slideguitar player in Europe. Together with a groovy and brilliant backup-band, Koechli made his own magic style: the spirit of the Celtic folk-music meets the intensity of blues and rock.
  • Kristi Bartleson & Reddesert, with an enchanting voice and unique sounds of her harp, this American singer and songwriter build inviting bridges between world and pop music. They create catchy and exotic sound patterns that are inspired by jazz, folk, classical and rock music. Kristi has been living in the Swiss canton of Zug since 1994.
  • Lè Vangle, is a fusion of French chanson, folk and world music. Reflecting numerous journeys throughout the world, their lyrics speak of politics, a bohemian lifestyle and life in general. And all of that with a dose of the humour and poetry that typify this foursome. Completely at home on stage, the band's members are capable of playing for hours without losing any of their contagious, overflowing energy. (in French)
  • Musique Simili, Gypsy music meets Occitan music. (in German)
  • Pareglish, mix Swiss Ländlermusik with Klezmer, International Folklore, Folk and Pop. (in German)
  • Pflanzplätz, Swiss traditional music. (in German)
  • The Pint, a Rhythm'n' (Irish) Folk band. (in German)
  • Prekmurski Kavbojci, has six members, all of them coming from different nations. This international mixture give them the possibility to have a very open repertoire: mainly Balcan music, butthey also play melodies of movies and cartoons as well as famous funk- and latin songs, and new compositions in funny cowboys style.
  • Pubside Down, by using different grooves and combining Irish-folkmusic with other styles such as reaggae, rock or even heavy metal the band is literally turning the traditional way of playing irish-folk upside down. In addition to that, they also write their own songs, which are usually built around a piece of a traditional Irish tune.
  • Quartet Laseyer, the Appenzeller music is present but has been developed further in different directions, with a variety of folk melodies from all over the world.
  • Quartett Res Schmid - Gebrüder Marti, Ländlermusik. (in German)
  • Red Shamrock, although there in no Irish blood in their veins, there is fire in their hearts, and the five young musicians catch the spirit of their audience by performing their "new traditional" Irish songs and tunes in an extraordinary firey way. (in German)
  • Josef Rempfler, plays traditional Appenzeller music with String Music Group Weissbad, Appenzeller Echo and Rondo(m) Appenzell. Free download of notes and MP3.
  • Sláinte, is a group based in the highlands of Zürich playing traditional songs and dance music from Ireland, Scotland and Brittany since 1980.
  • Ssassa, their vast repertoire covers stirring Gypsy music from Turkey, Macedonia, Kosovo, Bosnia and Greece, oriental dance music from Arab countries and also Flamenco. The synthesis of these traditional styles combined with a contemporary approach leads into a musical intercultural "firework", kept alight by the sounds of saxophone, clarinet, oud and percussion.
  • Standards of Rumantsch, "Rätoromanischen Volksliedern". (in German)
  • Stimmhorn, leave behind all categories and pass beyond all genres: with references to various musical styles and combined with theatrical elements, the duo, using the means of instrument and voice, invents acoustic voyages between traditional and experimental worlds of sound.
  • Stimmreise, a musical (vocal) trip throughout Switzerland. A yodeling project of Nadja Räss. (in German)
  • Streichmusik Alder, traditional music from the Appenzeller region. (in German)
  • Swiss Ländler Gamblers, traditional music, Dixieland, Jazz, and melodies from all over the world. (in German)
  • Tächa, comes from the Bernese Oberland and their music reflects their homeland, the Swiss Alps. However, lively rhythms are in contrasts with deeply emotional melodies that are reminescent of Blues.
  • Tarallucce, Southern Italian music. (in German)
  • Tritonus, plays old Swiss folk music. (in German
  • The Vad Vuc, their genre has been defined "Skauntry Irish Folk" and it is inspired by Pogues, Davide Van De Sfroos Band, Modena City Ramblers, Les Negresses Vertes, Mano Negra, ... Irish sound contaminated with reggae, ska, country, rockabilly. (in Italian)
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